Get a (health) kick out of fermenting your own probiotic-rich foods

Get a (health) kick out of fermenting your own probiotic-rich foods

Locally brewed kombucha. "Kefir, kombucha, jun, rejuvelac, kvass." Yes, she can talk "foreign", says Jeanne Rae, listing just a few fermented and cultured foods and drinks out there. These age-old concoctions are making a huge comeback around the world.

With a background in massage therapy, Rae’s " Cultured Kitchen " workshops in Hermanus and Stanford in the Western Cape teach people to make their own fermented and cultured foods. Often the workshops are full.

Indeed, these gassy foods are trending globally, particularly because of their health benefits.

"A cultured and fermented food [”cultured" meaning that it uses cultures to ferment] is a food that is rich in good microbes – bacteria that help our gut to flourish," she says. "These lactic acid-producing […]

15 Meaty Plant-Based Recipes for the Holidays

15 Meaty Plant-Based Recipes for the Holidays

Music in the air, festive decorations are up, and calorie counting becomes irrelevant. You’re too busy running to your next potluck to worry about such things. But what will you bring? You want to wow your friends with your amazing cooking skills, and show that plant-based meals can be delicious, as well as satisfying, to everyone’s taste buds. So, we dove into our awesome Food Monster App and found a variety of meatless, vegan entrées to enjoy this holiday seasons. 1. Lentil Loaf With Celery Root Mash

If you’re looking to quench your cravings for meatloaf or simply need an effortless, nutrient-dense recipe that doesn’t disappoint, you need to try out this Lentil Loaf and Celery Root […]

Healthy Devils: Easy egg sandwiches for nutritious brain food

Healthy Devils: Easy egg sandwiches for nutritious brain food

Editor’s Note: This is the third installment in an ASU Now series featuring nutritious recipes demonstrated by faculty from the School of Nutrition and Health Promotion , an academic unit of ASU’s College of Health Solutions . The first installment covered overnight oats , and the second installment was about electrolyte drinks .

If anyone knows a tough customer, it’s Sarah Martinelli, a clinical assistant professor of nutrition at Arizona State University. Her passion is improving food quality in school districts, where you’re likely to find some of the pickiest eaters around.

Luckily, almost everyone likes an egg sandwich. To that end, and in light of the close of finals week, Martinelli demonstrated for ASU Now a couple of […]

Healthy soups to keep you warm all winter

Healthy soups to keep you warm all winter

Photo by emiu This time of year, produce aisles are brimming with winter squash, leeks, mushrooms, cranberries and a host of other seasonal items. While it may seem more convenient to pop open a can of processed soup, there are actually a number of simple recipes that incorporate a variety of fresh, healthy ingredients for the winter months.

Naturopathic physician Dr. Tara Nayak specializes in personalized treatment and nutrition for patients, ranging from those in moderately good health to those battling complex digestive issues and chronic diseases. She recommends several “clean” winter soup recipes that promote healing and overall wellness. Each recipe is rich in vitamins, minerals and probiotics that can help promote better gut health.

A diet rich in whole foods includes pasture-raised chickens and eggs, grass-fed meat, wild-caught fish and organic produce. Whole food ingredients that Nayak recommends for winter soups include butternut squash, pumpkin, root vegetables, leafy greens, such as collard greens and turnip greens, and sweet potatoes. All of these are rich in vitamins and minerals and can help support the body’s immune system to prevent cold and flu.

6 Healthy Recipes You Can Make Using Food Scraps

6 Healthy Recipes You Can Make Using Food Scraps

When you’re cooking up a broccoli casserole or juicing a watermelon, you’re probably tossing the stem or the rind. But you might want to hold onto those scraps for a bit longer, because you can use them in surprising ways. It turns out that what you consider useless food scraps are actually loaded with high-quality nutrients.

So what are these foods parts you wouldn’t think to repurpose? They’re actually found in foods that are likely already in your fridge. Maggie Moon, MS, RDN, and author of The MIND Diet, gave us some recipes that use some of her favorite underused food parts.